Senator Hill, SFPD Chief, Peninsula Law Enforcement & MADD Announce Rollout of Statewide DUI Prevention Program

December 27, 2018

News Advisory – Office of State Senator Jerry Hill – December 28, 2018
Alert: News Conference Friday at San Francisco Police Headquarters

SFPD Chief William Scott, MADD Northern California Leader and Peninsula Law Enforcement Join State Senator Jerry Hill to Announce Statewide DUI Prevention Program Launching on New Year’s Day

Devices to Lock Down the Car Ignitions of Drivers Who Aren’t Sober Will Be Required for Repeat DUI Offenders and First-Time DUIs Involved in Injury Crashes

WHAT: Senator Jerry Hill and San Francisco Police Chief William Scott with MADD and Peninsula law enforcement partners hold a news conference to announce the statewide rollout of a pilot program requiring convicted repeat DUI offenders and certain first timers to install ignition interlock devices in their cars. The technology, known as IIDs, stops a car from starting if the would-be driver’s breath sample exceeds a preset blood alcohol concentration level.

The launch of the expanded program coincides with heightened efforts by San Francisco and regional police to promote safe and sober driving awareness and enforcement during the winter holidays.

WHEN: Noon on Friday, December 28, 2018

WHERE: San Francisco Police Department Headquarters
Press Conference Room
1245 Third Street, First Floor
San Francisco, CA 94158

Speakers:

  • San Francisco Police Chief William Scott
  • Senator Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties
  • Mothers Against Drunk Driving Northern California Regional Executive Director Natasha Thomas
  • Captain Aristotle Wolfe, Commander CHP San Francisco Area
  • San Bruno Police Chief Ed Barberini, president of the San Mateo County Police Chiefs and Sheriff Association 
  • Mary Klotzbach, longtime champion of IIDs for DUI prevention, whose son was killed by a drunk driver

Law enforcement representatives also attending included SFPD Deputy Chief Michael Redmond, Traffic Division Commander Teresa Ewins and Captain Raj Vaswani; Hillsborough Police Chief Mark O'Connor; San Mateo County Sheriff's Captain Saul Lopez, chief of the Coastside Patrol Bureau, serving the city of Half Moon Bay and the county's coastal communities; San Mateo County Sheriff's Detective Rosemerry Blankswade; South San Francisco Police Lieutenant Keith Wall; San Francisco Sheriff's Lieutenant Raymond Winters; Santa Clara County Sheriff's Sergeant Reginald Cooks on behalf of Sheriff Laurie Smith; and CHP Officer Bert Diaz, CHP San Francisco Area.

Visuals: A vehicle equipped with an ignition interlock device will be available for photos and video immediately after the news conference at the curbside.

Background:

Starting January 1, a pilot program now operating in four counties expands statewide and will require repeat DUI offenders and first-timers involved in injury crashes to install an ignition interlock device in their vehicles. The technology, better known as an IID, measures blood alcohol concentration after an individual blows into the device and prevents a car from starting if the driver is not sober.

The goal of the IID program is to prevent DUI offenders from driving drunk again and injuring or killing people.

More than 1,000 people die and over 20,000 are injured each year in California as a result of drunk driving. In the past 30 years, more than 50,000 people have died and over 1 million have been injured because of drunk drivers in the state.

In contrast, from December 2006 to December 2017 in California, IIDs stopped 220,792 drunk driving attempts by people with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher, according to research by Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Across the U.S. over the same period, IIDs prevented 2.7 million drunk driving attempts, the MADD study found.

From July 2010 through 2018, California’s initial pilot program required individuals convicted of drunk driving in Alameda, Los Angeles, Sacramento or Tulare counties to install an IID in the cars they drive.

Under Senate Bill 1046, authored by Senator Hill in 2016 and taking effect on New Year’s Day, the pilot program expands to all 58 counties and lifts the IID requirement for first-time DUI offenders who are not involved in an injury accident. At the same time, the expanded program provides a strong incentive for those first-timers to install an IID.

As of January 1, people convicted of:

Ø A first DUI involving no injuries may choose to have an IID installed in their cars for six months and retain full driving privileges. Or, they may forgo an IID and opt for a one-year restricted license that permits them only to drive to and from work or school and to and from a treatment program. Judges retain discretion to require IIDs for these first offenders.

Ø A first DUI involving an injury results in mandatory IID installation for one year.

Ø A second DUI also results in mandatory IID installation for one year.

Ø A third DUI results in a mandatory IID installation for two years.

Ø A fourth DUI and subsequent convictions result in mandatory IID installation for three years.

An IID costs less than $3 a day – approximately $60 to $80 per month – for monitoring and calibration. It costs $70 to $150 for installation. SB 1046 establishes a sliding scale of assistance enabling low-income offenders to pay 10 percent, 25 percent or 50 percent of the IID costs depending on income. The IID provider would pay the rest.

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Contacts:
For Senator Hill: Leslie Guevarra, 415-298-3404
For SFPD: David C. Stevenson, 415-837-7242
For MADD: Natasha Thomas, 925-452-8752, or Becky Iannotta, 202-600-2032

Originally posted December 24, 2018. Updated December 27, 2018, to add speakers and names of other law enforcement representatives attending.Updated December 28 after the event to list all law enforcement departments represented. The following supplemental material was made available to media at the news conference: 

More Resources:

How an IID works:

An IID is about the size of a cell phone and wired to your vehicle's ignition. After installation, the IID requires your breath sample before the engine will start. If the IID detects alcohol on your breath, the engine will not start. As you drive, you are periodically required to provide breath samples to ensure the continued absence of alcohol in your system.

CA DMV: https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/brochures/fast_facts/ffdl31/

A June 2016 report by the DMV on the four-county pilot program for IIDs found:

  • “A strong and reliable association between possession of an AB 91 IID restricted license and reduced DUI recidivism. Across all DUI offender levels, those with an IID restricted license have lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI conviction, and lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI incident when compared to drivers with suspended or revoked licenses.” {AB 91 is 2009 legislation by then Assemblymember Mike Feuer to authorize a four-county pilot program for IIDs.]

CA DMV: https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/wcm/connect/b1eba1e5-9155-40ba-9a74-0e6e19a0d1bc/S5-251.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CVID=

The report also found:

  • Executive summary – preface page 12: First DUI offenders:

“The AB 91 IID group is associated with 73% lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI conviction relative to the comparison group of suspended drivers.” [Emphasis added.]

“The AB 91 IID group is associated with 74% lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI incident relative to the comparison group of suspended drivers.”

  • Executive summary – preface page 13: Second DUI offenders:

“The AB 91 IID group is associated with 67% lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI conviction relative to the comparison group of suspended drivers.”

“The AB 91 IID group is associated with 70% lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI incident relative to the comparison group of suspended drivers.”

  • Executive summary – preface page 14: Third and subsequent DUI offenders:

“The comparison group of revoked subjects has an odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI conviction that is approximately 3.4 times higher than that associated with the AB 91 IID group.”

“The comparison group of revoked subjects has an odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI incident that is approximately 3.4 times higher than that associated with the AB 91 IID group.”

  • Executive summary – preface page 14: Conclusions:

“It bears emphasizing that the current study found a strong and reliable association between possession of an AB 91 IID restricted license and reduced DUI recidivism. Across all DUI offender levels, those with an IID restricted license have lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI conviction, and lower odds or hazards of a subsequent DUI incident when compared to drivers with suspended or revoked licenses.”

Information from MADD:

Ignition interlocks are effective in reducing repeat drunk driving offenses by 67 percent while the device is installed compared to license suspension alone. (CDC)

Interlocks help reduce repeat offenses even after the device is removed by 39 percent compared to offenders who never installed an interlock. (Marques, 2010)

First-time offenders are serious offenders. Research from the CDC indicates that first time offenders have driven drunk at least 80 times before they are arrested.

An interlock is more effective than license suspension alone, as 50 to 75 percent of convicted drunk drivers continue to drive on a suspended license.

All-offender interlock laws are widespread. Thirty-two states, DC plus a four-county California pilot program (covering a population of over 13 million) have laws requiring ignition interlocks for all first-time convicted drunk drivers. As of December 2017, there are approximately 349,030 interlocks in use in the United States

Ignition interlock laws saves lives. Due in part to laws requiring interlocks for all convicted drunk drivers, drunk driving deaths have declined dramatically and at a better pace compared to the national average decline:

West Virginia: 43%          Louisiana: 43% Delaware: 39%     Arizona: 30%      Mississippi: 30% Kansas: 24%                    New Mexico: 24%           New Hampshire: 18%                 Arkansas: 18%

Public supports Interlocks for all convicted drunk drivers.

Three surveys indicate strong public support of ignition interlocks for all convicted drunk drivers.

88 percent (Center for Excellence in Rural Safety, 2010)

84 percent (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, 2009)

76 percent (American Automobile Association, 2012)

MADD’s December 2017 update on IIDs use and effectiveness nationwide:

https://www.madd.org/blog/press-release/ignition-interlocks-prevented-354372-drunk-driving-attempts-in-2017/

MADD’s 10-year report on IIDs 2006-2016 in U.S.:

https://online.flippingbook.com/view/197837/2/

The federal government and other states also support the use of IIDs:

  • The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recommends that all people convicted of drunk driving should have ignition interlock devices installed in their cars.  NTSB supports SB 1046 saying, “Research evaluation of ignition interlock programs over the last two decades has found that ignition interlock devices are effective in reducing recidivism among DWI offenders, sometimes by as much as 62 to 75 percent.” “SB 1046 significantly upgrades California’s ignition interlock law by mandating devices for all offenders…providing your state another excellent step toward reducing crashes, injuries, and deaths involving alcohol-impaired drivers.”
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease and Prevention reviewed fifteen studies on the effectiveness of ignition interlock devices at reducing DUI recidivism, concluding: “re-arrest rates for alcohol-impaired driving decreased by a median of 67 percent relative to comparison groups.”  The CDC recommends Ignition interlocks for everyone convicted of DWI, even for first offenders.
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released their report, “Ignition Interlocks –What You Need To Know.” It found that “ignition interlocks, when appropriately used, prevent alcohol-impaired driving by DWI offenders, resulting in increased safety for all roadway users.”

“Research has shown that, while installed on an offender’s vehicle, ignition interlocks reduce recidivism among both first-time and repeat DWI offenders.”

“Ignition interlocks permit offenders to retain or regain legal driving status, thus enabling them to maintain employment and manage familial and court-ordered responsibilities that require driving. This is a particularly relevant benefit, as many offenders without interlocks drive illegally on a suspended/revoked license, often after drinking. The installation of an interlock on the offender’s vehicle reduces the probability of this occurring, thereby improving public safety.”

  • About 28 states have laws requiring ignition interlocks for all convicted drunk drivers. Since New Mexico's interlock law was implemented in 2005, drunk driving fatalities are down by 38 percent. Since Arizona and Louisiana implemented their interlock law in 2007, drunk driving deaths have decreased by 43 and 35 percent, respectively. In Oregon, as a result of a 2008 interlock law, DUI deaths are down 42 percent.

Other findings supporting use of IIDs to combat drunk driving:

  • Kaufmann, University of Pennsylvania, “Impact of State Ignition Interlock Laws on Alcohol-Involved Crash Deaths in the United States,” March 2016:
    • DUI deaths decreased by 15% in states that enacted all-offender interlock laws.
    • States with mandatory interlock laws saw a 0.8 decrease in deaths for every 100,000 people each year – which is comparable to lives shown to have been saved from mandatory airbag laws (0.9 lives saved per 100,000 people.
  • The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB):
    • “Research evaluation of ignition interlock programs over the last two decades has found that ignition interlock devices are effective in reducing recidivism among DWI offenders, sometimes by as much as 62 to 75 percent.” 
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease and Prevention:
    • Reviewed fifteen studies on the effectiveness of ignition interlock devices at reducing DUI recidivism, concluding: “re-arrest rates for alcohol-impaired driving decreased by a median of 67 percent relative to comparison groups.”  The CDC recommends Ignition interlocks for everyone convicted of DWI, even for first offenders.
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: “Ignition Interlocks –What You Need To Know.”
    • “A majority of offenders surveyed believe ignition interlock sanctions to be fair and reduce driving after drinking. Family members believed that ignition interlocks provided a level of reassurance that an offender was not driving while impaired and reported a generally positive experience and impact on the offender’s drinking habits.”